Books Early Readers Features Genre Lifespan of a Reader Non-fiction Wednesday Nonfiction Picture Books

[Nonfiction Wednesday] What Is Important About Margaret Wise Brown?

Do you know who Margaret Wise Brown is?

Fats here.

We are delighted to join the Nonfiction Picture Book meme 2020 hosted by Alyson Beecher @ Kid Lit Frenzy. We would also be linking our nonfiction choices with our reading themes throughout the year, when we can.

The Important Thing About Margaret Wise Brown

Written by Mac Barnett
Illustrated by Sarah Jacoby
Published by HarperCollins (2019)
ISBN-13: 9780062393449

This is one of my favorite spreads from the book.

Margaret Wise Brown was the writer of treasured children’s books such as Goodnight Moon and The Runaway Bunny. When Margaret was six, she had a dog, two squirrels, seven fish, two guinea pigs, a wild robin, and–get this–thirty-six rabbits for pets! One could say that her books were inspired by these animals.

Captivating illustrations by Sarah Jacoby.

I like how Barnett included the story about Anne Carroll Moore, a librarian at the New York Public Library, who deemed Brown’s books as “not recommended for purchase.” Goodnight Moon was banned from NYPL since its publication in 1947 until 1972. That’s a quarter of a century!

The Important Thing About Margaret Wise Brown is a bold yet lyrical portrayal of a writer who embraced her peculiarity, withstood against all odds, and remained steadfast throughout her career. As Barnett noted in his book, the important thing about Margaret Wise Brown was that she wrote books.

No good book is loved by everyone,
and any good book is bound to bother somebody.
Because every good book is at least a little bit strange,
and there are some people who do not
like strange things in their worlds.

– Mac Barnett, The Important Thing About Margaret Wise Brown

Buy The Important Thing About Margaret Wise Brown on
Amazon | Book Depository

0 comments on “[Nonfiction Wednesday] What Is Important About Margaret Wise Brown?

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