Art & Travel Photo Journal

[Photo Journal] My Book Of Kells Pilgrimage In Dublin, Ireland

Latin name: Codex Cenannensis; Irish: Leabhar Cheanannais

photojournal

Myra here.

Every Tuesday, we share photographs from our recent or long-ago travels, or just everyday stuff that appealed to our mindful eye and sharp sensibilities as captured through fleeting images.

My Book Of Kells Pilgrimage at Trinity College In Dublin, Ireland

Last year, I presented a paper at the European Council for High Ability Learners Conference in Dublin, Ireland. Naturally, I had to visit Trinity College and do my Book of Kells pilgrimage.

As explained by Wikipedia:

The Book of Kells is an illuminated manuscript Gospel book in Latin, containing the four Gospels of the New Testament together with various prefatory texts and tables. It was created in a Columban monastery in either Britain or Ireland and may have had contributions from various Columban institutions from both Britain and Ireland. It is believed to have been created c. 800 AD.

Trinity College is also absolutely beautiful, and steeped in so much history. Just visiting the university alone is worth the trip.

While visitors are allowed to take photos of the exhibition, the actual Book of Kells is heavily guarded – and no one is permitted to take photographs. Hence, I can only show you the magnified replica of certain pages of the book, which is just as well, really.

You spend too much time on ephemeras. The majority of modern books are merely wavering reflections of the present. They disappear very quickly. You should read more old books. The classics. Goethe. What is merely new is the most transitory of all things. It is beautiful today, and tomorrow merely ludicrous. 
― Franz Kafka

Where books had been a comfort before, they became a necessity, old books best of all: thick heavy tomes with stories that spread and twisted through other worlds, where he could walk like a ghost in the footsteps of other lives.
― Alexia Casale, House of Windows
A series of books, dilapidated and faded, sit bundled together. Most of the bindings are separating from the yellowed pages, but each is at home in its battered state. Their wrinkled pages and discolored skin tell not of old age, but of a good life. These books, unlike so many others, were not just read, but revisited, loved, and experienced. 
― Kelseyleigh Reber, If I Resist
Old books, yes! They are the true comforters; and principally because they are old and familiar. Many excellent new tales and poems and dramas are added yearly to the catalogues, and and some of these in time will stand beside the great companions under discussion; but only Time (and you and I and all other lovers of good books) will bring about their survival. 
― Vincent Starrett, Books Alive

Sometimes, looking at the many books I have at home, I feel I shall die before I come to the end of them, yet I cannot resist the temptation of buying new books. Whenever I walk into a bookstore and find a book on one of my hobbies — for example, Old English or Old Norse poetry — I say to myself, “What a pity I can’t buy that book, for I already have a copy at home. 
― Jorge Luis Borges, This Craft of Verse

To build up a library is to create a life. It’s never just a random collection of books.
― Carlos María Domínguez, The House of Paper

Free Delivery on all Books at the Book Depository

1 comment on “[Photo Journal] My Book Of Kells Pilgrimage In Dublin, Ireland

  1. Stunning! Thanks, Myra. I totally understand why you refer to it as a pilgrimage.

    Liked by 1 person

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