[Nonfiction Wednesday] International Efforts To Reunite A Cat With His Family in “Lost And Found Cat”

nfwed

Myra here.

We are delighted to join the Nonfiction Picture Book meme 2017 hosted by Alyson Beecher @ Kid Lit Frenzy. We would also be linking our nonfiction choices with our reading themes throughout the year.

I have been seeing this picturebook shared in the blogosphere and I know that it is a perfect book to feature given our current reading theme on Middle Eastern Literature.


Lost And Found Cat: The True Story of Kunkush’s Incredible Journey

Written by: Doug Kuntz and Amy Shrodes Illustrated by: Sue Cornelison
Published by: Crown Books for Young Readers, 2017
ISBN: 1524715476 (ISBN13: 9781524715472).
Borrowed through inter-library loan. Book photos taken by me.

The initial setting of the story takes the reader to the city of Mosul in Iraq where a mother and her five children (four daughters and one son) were on their way to flee their war-torn country after the father has recently died.

This is not as simple as it sounds since the family had to put their lives in the hands of smugglers, travel through forests and mountains, sleep in the woods, travel through Istanbul in a bus, cross the Aegean sea to Greece, before they can travel to their next destination. Throughout all this, Sura, the mother, made sure that they brought their beloved cat, Kunkush, with them, notwithstanding the fact that bringing a pet along is technically not allowed by the smugglers who would demand more money had they known about Kunkush.

It was in the island of Lesbos that the family lost Kunkush, as he immediately sped away the minute the family landed on the island.

Layered throughout the story is the family’s courage, the young children’s resilience as they regarded everything they were experiencing as an adventure. The story would have ended on this island, if not for the kindness of strangers who found Kunkush, took him in, seeing that he was unlike the local cats who frightened the domesticated Kunkush away. Things are also different now with social media allowing stories like these to have a much happier ending, and for loved ones to be reunited against all odds:

I was also able to find this feature by The Guardian on Youtube. Enjoy!

  1. annettepimentel May 4, 2017 at 12:06 am

    My library just got this book in. Can’t wait to read it. I’m so glad my librarians are being so receptive to my requests for diverse titles. I hope lots of people make similar requests at their libraries. It’s a great way to influence what kinds of books get published.

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  2. I thought this book really gave a basic idea to young readers about refugees. Not too much information, but enough they start thinking about what it could mean.

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  3. Thank you for sharing this one–I hadn’t heard of it before. I just requested it from my library.

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  4. I’m sure kids will enjoy this. Thanks for sharing that YouTube video.

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