[Nonfiction Wednesday] The Father Of Psychoanalysis Portrayed in Graphic Novel Format

nfwed

Myra here.

We are delighted to join the Nonfiction Picture Book meme 2017 hosted by Alyson Beecher @ Kid Lit Frenzy. We would also be linking our nonfiction choices with our reading themes throughout the year.

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Given our current reading theme, I thought it would be timely to share the graphic novel depiction of the life story of the Father of Psychoanalysis himself, Sigmund Freud.


Freud

Written by: Corinne Maier Illustrated by: Anne Simon Translated From French by: J. Taboy
Published by: Nobrow, 2014
ISBN: 978-1-907704-73-4
Bought a copy of the book. Book photos taken by me.

My first real love is psychology. I have, after all, devoted years of my life in pursuit of understanding human behaviour, the human mind and various affective states of being. My doctoral degree is in clinical psychology, and as such, Freud is what you would call a household name that can be traced all the way back to my undergraduate years. And so it was interesting to see how Sigmund Freud’s life story narrative has been portrayed here in such an irreverent, comical, almost-offhand fashion.

The book begins with a portrayal of Freud’s family, with a clear mention of how he has always been his mother’s favourite. Perhaps the idea is that the reader would have a glimpse into the thinker that he would eventually become, especially given his very evident love for research.

I was also especially taken by how his famous cases were mentioned here – which we have examined in great detail as undergraduate students – from the case of Anna O:

to the case of little Hans:

among others that were briefly alluded to. His falling out with many of his followers, along with the man whom Freud perceived to be his heir-apparent, Carl Gustav Jung, was likewise shown here:

Freud’s addiction to cocaine and mushrooms have been mentioned here as well.

As I read this now, I am amazed by how much credence he was given at the time, especially given his very unorthodox views. I also wonder, if he had not been under the influence of substances, would he have the courage to say the things he did. Evidently, he managed to tap into people’s unspoken anxieties/desires/energies at the time, making his views quite popular then.

For people who already know who Freud was, and his significant contributions to the field of psychology, and his founding of the psychoanalytic school of thought, it will prove to be an off-the-cuff, non-traditional supplemental read to the man and his life’s work.

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