poet's sanctum Poetry Friday

Poetry Friday: Suite Saxophone Windows of Tala Mundi

Last week, we shared Tita Lacambra Ayala’s latest publication entitled Tala Mundi which is a grand collection of her poetry over the past years. We have likewise noted how the book is divided into five sections or Suites as Ricardo M. de Ungria (the editor) calls them. I shared two poems from the Suite Gift of Silent Waters last week and so today I share with you two selections from Suite Saxophone Windows. Poetry Friday is being hosted this week by Karen at Karen at Edmisten. I would also include a few of Madam Tita’s photos and artwork courtesy of her brilliant singer-songwriter daughter, Cynthia Alexander.

Self Portrait of Tita Lacambra Ayala

A Turning Into Oneself by Tita Lacambra Ayala, 1974, p. 138 from Tala Mundi

A turning into oneself
a humming of songs
                long lost
      fiber of thoughts
                stretched
to breaking point
 
How build the dam again
      how push back into
               place
the breaks in the walls
the fallen posts
                              nail back
                     the twisted wires
remold a barricade
                     against the tides
 
A turning into self
    but learning
    a new song
a truth unto one’s own
 
 
Groovy Grandma Indeed - photo courtesy of Cynthia Alexander

A Poem About Emptiness by Tita Lacambra Ayala, 1984, p. 151 from Tala Mundi

poetry draws a blank
it cuts an empty Landscape in the empty
      frame
about emptiness
it is mostly about emptiness
it is mostly racial memory about
racial emptiness it is mostly
blank
 
we have given
each other up myself
and the landscapes of poetry
poetry
and the landscapes of itself
we both are back to where
we were never before
 
we are both
blank

Myra is a Teacher Educator and a registered clinical psychologist based in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates. Prior to moving to the Middle East, she lived for eleven years in Singapore serving as a teacher educator. She has edited five books on rediscovering children’s literature in Asia (with a focus on the Philippines, Malaysia, India, China, Japan) as part of the proceedings for the Asian Festival of Children’s Content where she served as the Chair of the Programme Committee for the Asian Children’s Writers and Illustrators Conference from 2011 until 2019. While she is an academic by day, she is a closet poet and a book hunter at heart. When she is not reading or writing about books or planning her next reads, she is hoping desperately to smash that shuttlecock to smithereens because Badminton Is Life (still looking for badminton courts here at UAE - suggestions are most welcome).

9 comments on “Poetry Friday: Suite Saxophone Windows of Tala Mundi

  1. I like the double meaning of “turning into oneself” — the inward turning, as well as the metamorphosis!

    Like

  2. I feel as if I am taking a Tita Lacambra Ayala class and you are my professor 🙂

    My favorite bit from this week:

    How build the dam again
    how push back into
    place
    the breaks in the walls
    the fallen posts
    nail back
    the twisted wires
    remold a barricade
    against the tides

    Like

    • Hi Tabatha! I soo soo enjoyed your Neruda-inspired-fashion-sense-post. I just had to repost the link in my personal FB account.

      Yes, I was also struck with the helplessness of the lines, the yearning for that which is lost and not being able to prepare oneself for the inevitable. The tides come in regardless of one’s prayers, well-wishes, fervent hopes. It is what it is.

      I am glad that you’re enjoying the feature. =) Truly warms the heart.

      Like

  3. Love the cyclical, stark reality of the second one. So enjoy being introduced to new poets. Thank you!

    Like

  4. Thank you for continuing to share this thought-provoking work with us… very powerful.

    Like

  5. Pingback: Carnival of Children’s Literature and Round-up for August |

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